Microsoft and Windows Round-up - 3.8.2010

Microsoft and Windows Round-up – 3.8.2010

Well the new Hotmail, as part of the larger Windows Live Wave 4 initiative, has rolled out for everyone and I got to admit it is looking pretty smooth. The only beef I have so far is that you can only add four additional email addresses to pull in – not sure why this is the cut off point.

Microsoft:

  • Microsoft’s LightSwitch: Building business apps for Web, PCs and cloud – Mary Jo Foley
    Microsoft’s “KittyHawk” — a rapid-application-development tool targeted at fledgling coders who are interested in building business applications — now has an official name: Visual Studio LightSwitch
  • Oh no Microsoft! Don’t kill HTML Email again! – WMPoweruser
    MobilityDigest has discovered, via Herm Software, that the handling of pictures on Windows Phone 7 is very similar to Windows Mobile 6 – No automatic downloading of pictures, and no option to change it
  • Kinect: the backstory – Steve Clayton
    Network World covered Craig Mundie’s talk at our Financial Analyst Meeting last week and zoned in on the Kinect discussion.

Windows Phone 7:

Bing:

  • How Bing is out-innovating Google – CNN
    Google is one of the smartest, most innovative companies in the world, but in its core business — online search — it’s being routinely shown up by Microsoft’s third-place search engine, Bing.
  • Bing Maps learns to calculate taxi fares before Google – DVICE
    Microsoft has figured out a clever way to inject some innovation into its search service, Bing, with a contest called the “King of Bing Maps.” It’s paying off, as Bing is getting a leg-up on its arch nemesis, Google Maps by learning some new tricks first.
  • Bing Maps looked ugly before, now looks like s*** – istartedsomething.com
    I’ve never been a fan of the Bing Maps/Virtual Earth color scheme so when I read reports today that it had been updated, I was hopeful Microsoft might have injected some vibrancy and fine detail into their otherwise dull and indistinct maps. That was before I realized Microsoft wanted to make their maps look worse.